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Posts Tagged ‘United States of America’

It was like watching a silent movie. We could see the action but there was no sound and the action was so fast we couldn’t comprehend what our eyes had just seen. The only noise we did hear came from the screaming people watching the action happening. And for these first timers, it registered as a dream to actually witness such an event.DSC_0139

Thus, was our feeling of experiencing the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky, live and in person. It was dream-like viewing “The Run for the Roses” as we saw the famous horse race from our Jockey Club Suite overlooking the racetrack because we were on a Tauck Events tour to see the Derby and experience the beautiful horse country area of Kentucky.IMG_1573IMG_1669JPG

On the way to the Derby, I happen to sit beside a man who said he was from Louisville so I asked him what horse was ranked high for winning the Derby. And he told me several names. But when he mentioned Always Dreaming I said that’s the one I will bet on because I just loved the name. It was so appropriate for the horse to always be dreaming for a win.DSC_0714.jpg

IMG_1590June Landrum. my traveling companion, and I are not gamblers. But we were at the Kentucky Derby #143 and just had to gamble once. So, June came up with the idea of betting $2 on each horse so both would gamble $20 on 20 horses. Our bet would total $40. And we would pick the winner no matter who it was we reasoned. DSC_0091And yes, we picked the winner Always Dreaming and collected $11.50 for first place. We split the winnings and had a wonderful time with our scheme of betting and picking the winner.IMG_1635JPG

But I just had to bet on Always Dreaming as it was the horse I said I would bet on. So, with $10 in hand, I placed my first bet ever on a horse race. And yes. I won and after I won, I asked myself why I didn’t bet $100 or $1000 if I was so sure Always Dreaming would win. But it was fun gambling for the first time at the Kentucky Derby and picking the winner.DSC_0092

At the Kentucky Derby, it was “normal” for women and men to dress up and it was a fashion show like no other. IMG_1537Every color, size and shape of hat was worn by ladies of every color shape and size. But the most outstanding of the fashion show was the huge outstanding statement-making ladies hats. IMG_1648JPGThose hats set the southern mood of the Derby as it had been done for 147 years. And the men’s outfits completed the fun and theme of the classic Kentucky Derby.IMG_1538

But before we could go on this tour, we just had to make our hats to wear to the Derby although they were not required for the tour event. But attending the Derby without that world-famous tradition of a big hat would not complete the experience for us first timers. So, June Landrum and I designed and re-designed our hats until we were happy with our creations.

I wanted a black hat with a big brim, so my sister offered one of her sun hats that had a large brim. And from that, I took it around with me as I shopped for the perfect decorations. It was fun creating and making our hats and June and I had many fun conversations on how our designs were working for our Kentucky Derby event. June’s hat was a gift from her grandson and she never planned to use it for the Derby. DSC_0092.JPGBut after purchasing little roses, she decided to put them on the hat to wear to the Derby because it was “the Run for the Roses.”IMG_1637JPG

Our next creation was how to get the newly created hat to Kentucky. So, I used an old packing trick that worked for many other hats I had purchased on several of my foreign trips and it worked for this Derby hat. I put the hat flat in my luggage and stuffed the crown full of clothes I was taking that did not wrinkle. And I put clothes flat under the hat and on top of the brim. That kept the hat in its original shape and it made it to Louisville safely and intact. The decorations were in a rigid plastic container.IMG_1535

When we arrived, we glued all the silk flowers and feathers on the brim and the hat was ready to wear. June made her hat by gluing those silk roses on the hat and we had our personal creations to parade around at the Derby.IMG_1538

But we didn’t just parade around at the Kentucky Derby in them. We also wore them the day before the Derby at the Kentucky Oaks, the “pre-Derby” race and ‘The Run for the lilies”. IMG_1567 And we wore them for all the 10 races before the Kentucky Derby on Derby day. It was so much fun walking around in the rain in our decorated hats as we looked at others with their decorated hats. It was a first time to ever do such an event and it was just an awesome experience.IMG_1645DSC_0220DSC_0214.JPG

Now that our hats were designed and worn at a race, we had to participate in Bridles and Bourbon. So, we visited the time-honored art of distilling, aging, and bottling fine Kentucky Bourbon at the Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky, the oldest continually operating distillery in America. DSC_0092And yes, we had to sample their award-winning product and then have a barbeque lunch in the Clubhouse at Buffalo Trace. It all was so delicious as was the welcome reception and dinner with a local bluegrass band and folk-dance troupe.DSC_0103

As we drove to Margaux Farms, we enjoyed the clean and gorgeous green-hill farms of Lexington, Kentucky. This visit was to see the horses in their stalls at the Brood Farm and how they are worked and managed for breeding. As we walked into one barn, all the horses bellowed at once their neigh-neigh sound as they looked at us. DSC_0112.JPGAnd I just loved our wonderful unique horse greeting we were given until the keepers told us the horses were calling for food, not us. And another keeper told us they were wanting to exercise. Anyway, each of our Tauck group greeted a horse and enjoyed learning the methods used to make sure each mare got pregnant. But we didn’t have any food or exercise for them.DSC_0041

But then, the next morning, we had to be at Kneeland Race Track at 6 a.m. to watch the jockeys exercise the horses at that race track. It was cool enough for a jacket and we could see the horse’s breath as they finished their race exercises.DSC_0031 Again, I was amazed how quiet it was as they ran. And it was so fast, we didn’t get a good look at them until they stopped and came up to us for photos and a visit. DSC_0040

Having dinner at Kneeland Race Track with Hall of Fame jockey Chris McCarron was another highlight of our Kentucky Derby experience. DSC_0240.JPGIn his speech, he gave a wonderful overview of his unbelievable racing wins from the beginning at 19 years to retirement 28 years later. And when he retired he was thoroughbred’s All-Time leader, and his purse earnings totaled more than $264 million in winnings and 7,141 races won.IMG_1514

It had been raining for 2 days but as soon as the thoroughbreds started running, it stopped and they stopped after 2 minutes and the race was over. And the rainy and muddy conditions didn’t hinder anyone at the Kentucky Derby. But the excitement before the race was so much fun and it kept building as 150,000 persons placed their bets on the winners. And we picked the winner, Always Dreaming. But If you blinked your eyes, you missed it because they were running 40 miles per hour for the roses.

Photo Copy © 2018 carolyntravels.com

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People raised their hands and arms high in the air wanting more and more trinkets and then surrounding our pedicab and begging for more. Why are these trinkets wanted so much, I wondered.DSC_0367

It is the human exchange of value from one person to another, I was told by natives of New Orleans. And it is the thrill of catching those beads, plush toys, necklaces, plastic cups, doubloons (Krewe coins), and shells and getting a little gift during this time of celebration. It is the tradition of Mardi Gras in New Orleans.DSC_0310

And catching and throwing trinkets has been going on at Mardi Gras parades in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, since 1870 when the Krewe of Twelfth Night Revelers became the first Krewe (crew) to throw Mardi Gras “throws”. And the Krewes have been throwing them ever since. And the people love it, both the throwers and the receivers, for this is celebration time in New Orleans before the fast begins for Easter.DSC_0038

Mardi Gras began in 1703 in Mobile, Alabama and soon was celebrated in New Orleans by the 1730’s where it became the premier celebration in the USA to this day. Mardi Gras is always held 47 days before Easter in the Christian religion. It begins Jan. 6 each year on the Feast of Epiphany or King’s Day. Parades are held all over New Orleans during this 47-day period by scores and scores of Krewes.DSC_0096

And it all culminates on the last day, Fat Tuesday (Mardi Gras in French) when people stuff themselves, before the start of Lent on the next day, Ash Wednesday, where all begin to fast or give up something for Lent for 46 days to Easter. Mardi Gras is the time of parties, celebrations, food and drinks to the max before the fasting begins. And everyone joins in with the Krewes to party.DSC_0052

A Krewe is a group of revelers that band together to host a Mardi Gras ball, ride on a Mardi Gras parade float, and participates in social gatherings. So Sharon and I joined the Krewe of Tucks which began in 1969 by a group of students from Loyola University who came up with the name “Tuck” from a no-name pub. It started as a rag-tag group or animal house “theme” where anything goes yet keeps its sense of humor on everything.Carolyn-Sharon together-Mardi Gras 2017

We were told we would be lionesses, queens of the jungle, and each would ride in a pedicab “float”. So we arrived the day the final 5-day festivities began. Awaiting us was our costumes, designed by Mardi Gras costume designer, Alan. We laughed and laughed and took photos as we put on each costume piece. As luck would have it, that stash of large safety pins that had been riding in the checked bag for months came in handy as we pinned the lion’s furry “legs” to our black sweat clothes to keep them from falling off. More pins kept the lion’s ears in place. With all on and pinned, it was show time.DSC_0812

Arriving at out parade gathering location around 10 am, we saw some of the other funny characters in our parade. As we waited for the parade, we learned that it would be delayed for hours because a float in the parade before ours had a tire bend under the float. It was so bad; the repair man had to come to the float because it could not be moved.DSC_0734

So we had time to see other floats like the man riding in a recliner chair on wheels complete with beer and cigarettes. And a group of bicycles that became a dinosaur, an elephant, a tiger and other fun designer animals. It was hodge-podge and it was so much fun.DSC_0303

But I didn’t realize what fun was to come as the parade finally started 1 ½ hours late. As our pedicab advanced along the parade route, we were inundated by revelers, one after the other. Soon our bag full of beads and shells and necklaces was empty.Carolyn Blows Kiss to Black Lady at Mardi Gras 2017

Talking to the people, seeing them in their creative costumes and interacting with them was the ultimate fun. And we did this for 6 miles and almost 4 hours. DSC_0528

When it ended, we did walk and move our arms slowly but we were very happy to have had a one-of-a-kind experience. And the people seemed to enjoy our costumes and pedicab “floats” as they took many photos of us..

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Even the trees catch the trinkets. But after Mardi Gras, the person who owns the tree cleans all the beads off so it doesn’t harm the tree.

We thought we had seen all the Mardi Gras parades until we attended the Mardi Gras Indian parade. It began by meeting the big chief, Shaka Zulu, a Mardi Gras Indian, in Congo Square in the French Quarter where he told us about the Indians and showed his elaborate costume. Shaka Zulu explained that the Indians began doing their own celebrations and parade because the Indians felt they could not do Mardi Gras with the American Sector of New Orleans.

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Chief of the Mardi Gras Indians is Shaka Zulu who also made his costume and personally hand beaded all accents. Then he added the feathers to make his costume an outstanding piece of art.

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So the 42 tribes started their own mask making, creating and hand sewing their beaded costume and finishing it with elaborate colored feathers. Then, each put it all together to wear and show in their “Black Parade.”DSC_0157

“We used to burn our costumes after Mardi Gras so no evidence existed of us.  And, we would make a new one anyway for the next year’s Mardi Gras, “Shaka Zulu said. But now their incredibly gorgeous costumes are placed in the Backstreet Museum for all to see.DSC_0908

Before or during parades, each day we attended a party along a parade route at a private home all decorated up with Mardi gras colors of purple signifying justice, green for faith and gold for power. At these private home parties, we also viewed a major Krewe’s night lighted parade while sitting on the front porch or balcony in perfect viewing seats.DSC_0166

At one parade, Sharon and I were sitting on the front porch of a gorgeous 1850’s home watching the parade go by. Sharon stood up one time with her hands in the air begging for a trinket. A man on a float saw her and threw her a bag of beads full of many necklaces and it landed on my foot. It was like a large rock had landed on my foot/ankle. My foot hurt so much and so long that I had to have a bag of ice applied to stop the pain. And it worked and I was fine.DSC_0912

When we watched parades, we were eating delicious New Orleans dishes like Jumbo, Jambalaya, Crawfish Etouffee, Red Beans and Rice, PoBoys, or Muffelettas, with King Cakes and Beignets for dessert. This Virtuoso trip was a dream to experience plus we had a major adventure with Mardi Gras.mardi Gras

And all I did was ask that my travel agent Maureen Paap (mpaap@departurelounge.com) book a hotel for us during Mardi Gras. And we got wonderful revelers begging us for trinkets as we rode in costume in our pedicab with the Krewe of Tucks, went to parties at private homes, watched many parades, enjoyed our own parade as we participated in Fat Tuesday in our pedicab, and other experiences of a lifetime during Mardi Gras in New Orleans.DSC_0931

Contact your travel agent for this Virtuoso experience.

Photo Copy ©  2017 carolyntravels.com 

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Sharon didn’t catch that bag of necklaces that hit my foot so she went into the shrubbery to get other trinkets that had been thrown and also missed their intended recipient.

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When I took a Deviled Egg from this beautiful plate and complemented the hostess of the party that is was so delicious, she said that deviled eggs were back in style now. I was so amazed because I didn’t know they were ever out of style. As I left the party, the plate was empty.

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Another thing that caught my eye was these 6 foot (2 meters) wooden ladders that parents brought to the parade. They had a box mounted to the top of the ladder with wheels on the box and they pushed the entire thing like a wheelbarrow. The parents put their small children in them so they could see and enjoy the parades.

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Carolyn waistup in pedicab at Mardi Gras 2017

In the 4-hour parade, I carried snacks and water to keep up my strength. My favorite quick snack is baby food in a pouch. It is so convenient and only takes a minute for a mid-day picker-upper.

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Magic Moment Memories of Tauck’s World Discovery’s “Winter in Yellowstone” Event

*The pack of wolves howling on the other side of the valley while a wolf, a golden eagle and raven were on the opposite side eating an elk. It was so loud and lasted 2-3 minutes

*The ride from Mammoth Hot Springs to Old Faithful Snow Lodge in a school bus yellow bulldozer-wheeled bus-Glaval-a one of a kind ride

*Seeing a wolf and raven thru a telescope eating an elk

*Seeing fumaroles, hot springs, geysers and mud pots while walking in the snow at Fountain Paint Pots

*Gerard Baker, the Mandan Hidatsa Indian, on our tour who spoke to us about his Indian customs and traditions—a priceless one-of-a-kind encounter. He wore a full length bison coat and coyote Davy Crocket style fur hat

*Bob Landis, the world renowned filmmaker-movie maker, showing us some of his outstanding footage of scenes in Yellowstone-the red fox diving head first in the snow, otters sliding down a snow-covered hill, a swan walking in the snow, 2 eagles grasping each other in flight and then letting go right before they fell to the ground and more.

*A coyote jumping up and then diving head first into the snow to get a rodent and capturing the instant it happened on my camera

*The snow and snowing to white-out was so much fun

*Walking in the snow and hearing crunch, crunch, crunch as we walked

*The Hop-On Hop-Off method Tauck used to tour Yellowstone- pull up to the dedicated path, get out, walk in a little loose snow, then onto the dedicated path, see the feature, and return the same way back.

*Standing in line in 23 degree below zero snow for 10-12 minutes waiting to use the “one-holer”  porta potty with a foot of snow on its roof. Priceless.

*A herd of snow-covered Bison on the road walking right by our Bombardier and blocking our passage

*Three Trumpeter Swans just a swimming in a snow-covered river while it was snowing heavily.

*The Indian Prayer given in native Indian language and English by Gerard Baker while we stood in the snow-covered road of Enchanted Forest surrounded by snow-covered pine trees in 23 degrees temperature. Priceless

*Stopping for hot chocolate and popcorn in a Warming Hut in the middle of a day’s sightseeing

*Seeing the “Ice Trees”, flocked trees, Rime Frost crystals and Needle Frost crystals around steam vents and hot springs and learning about them from Jim Halfpenny

*Having Janee and Jim Sundby as tour directors, both beyond outstanding

*Having the Tauck 3-generation family on tour with us and getting to know them

*Walking in the snow at night

*Dressed like mummies in so many layers to keep warm we could barely bend or move

*Getting the one-of-a-kind opportunity to experience this winter wonderland, thanks to Tauck World Discovery

*Getting the opportunity to meet personally with the best experts associated with Yellowstone National Park.

*The Bighorn Ram looking down at us from a 15ft. hill

*Getting the opportunity to have a first-time encounter the entire tour with Gerard Baker, a real Indian that we could relate to and understand

*Learning that our final Bombardier ride would be the last Bombardier ride in Yellowstone because of new snow transportation being introduced.

*Getting to wear very casual, plain warm clothes everyday of the tour, including to Cocktail Parties and Welcoming and Farewell Dinners. Priceless

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